The Spiritual Vision of J.S. Bach

In April 2009, British atheist A.N. Wilson shocked the world by announcing that he was returning to the Christian faith. When asked later in an interview what was the worst thing about being faithless, the writer and newspaper columnist replied:

When I thought I was an atheist I would listen to the music of Bach and realize that his perception of life was deeper, wiser, more rounded than my own. . . . The Resurrection, which proclaims that matter and spirit are mysteriously conjoined, is the ultimate key to who we are. It confronts us with an extraordinarily haunting story. J. S. Bach believed the story, and set it to music.

A.N. Wilson is not alone. In his Introduction to the book Does God Exist? Peter Kreeft noted that he personally knows three ex-atheists who were swayed by the argument, “There is the music of Bach, therefore there must be a God.” Of these, Kreeft informed his readers, two are now philosophy professors and one is a monk.

Even the God-hater Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), upon hearing a performance of the St. Matthew Passion, was compelled to admit that “one who has completely forgotten Christianity truly hears it here as gospel.”

Bach would certainly approve, for he once remarked that “music’s only purpose should be the glory of God and the refreshment of the human spirit.” To underscore this point, he wrote the initials SDG (Soli Deo Gloria) at the end of most of his scores.

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Food and Music

One of the factors behind the American fast-food movement is the assumption that eating should be as easy as possible and that the ideal meal is one that requires a minimum amount of effort on the part of the consumer and provider. The proliferation of microwave dinners has also been fueled by the assumption that eating should be an experience with as little effort, time, and struggle as possible. This is in marked contrast to the rest of the world, especially Southern Europe and South-East Asia, where much time and effort is devoted to meals.

In Southern Europe much time and effort is devoted to meals, which serve important social functions as a result.

In Southern Europe much time and effort is devoted to meals, which serve important social functions as a result.

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